Travels

Lanzarote: notes on Canarian gastronomy

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Almost centennial Malvasia vine

Continuing our trip to the Canary Islands with the people of Saborea SpainWe arrived on the island of Lanzarote. The first impression I had from the plane was that this place was not exactly a tropical garden, nor the English countryside, much less the fertile lands of the Valencian orchard, so I thought “we are going to see and wish to find quality native products”But alas! how wrong I was…

I immediately understood that my first sensation was the result of the topics of sun and beach that we usually associate with all the Canary Islands but upon arriving at the superb, beautiful and to some extent overwhelming cheese factory of the Finca de Uga, a project belonging to the Stratvs group With ramifications in the world of wine and tourism, I checked once again that when you travel you should leave preconceived ideas in a small house.

Festival of multipremiados cheeses in Finca de Uga

There we ate some of the best cheeses I have ever tasted, (up to 16 different varieties awarded in the best international competitions) to then go to the Stratvs winery (highly recommended visit, including one tasting per person) where we had the first contact with the Local wines, aromatic and delicate but not cloying and whose simplicity falls in love. A good example ofTerroir

But how can cheese and wine be made in a landscape as barren as that of Lazarote? you will be wondering, well, very simple (or not) thanks to the efforts of its inhabitants. The cheese is made with the milk of the native goats of the island (an animal especially well adapted to extreme climates) and a lot of artisan work, as well as wine, as you can see and drink in the cellars installed in the area of The Geria like this one of Stratvs or El Grifo which is a good example because they have been making wine since 1775 and that is not something that everyone can say.

The sweets of Bodegas El Grifo

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