Travels

Gurué and trekking to Mount Namuli of Mozambique (Part 1)

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Gurué houses

In a country where the highest mountain -monte Binga- does not exceed 2,440 Altitude meters it is clear that mountaineering is not anyone's forte. However, walk the paths of the rugged area of Gurué, in the province of Zambezia, it is an experience that goes far beyond sports or landscapes.

Mozambique It is a country that has few major cities. Only the capital, Maputo, the industrial Tete and the commercial Nampula seemed worthy of such an appellation. Agricultural areas win by scoring the poor industrial development of one of the weakest economies in Africa, and the province of Zambezia is a clear example of this.

But Mount namuli, of 2,413 meters, is much more than a mere mountain. The Norwegian friend who encouraged me to travel to this area of ​​the country told me that the sacred character of the Namuli gave him a special magic.

Although the Portuguese colonizers brought the Catholic religion of their kings beyond the seas, the multiple African religions that existed before their arrival are still part of the Mozambican traditions. Animists, sorcerers and sorcerers are still important in the continent where the human being was born.

Tea factory and plantation

We thought about all this when we arrived on a gravel with wheels to the town of Gurué. To get to our destination we had traveled ten hours (300 kms) by train from Nampula to Cuambá, and then spent another four lying in the box of a truck that made its way between the dirt roads and dirt.

We explored Gurué for a day while recovering energies to undertake the trekking to Namuli and we were waiting for the arrival of our Argentine friend, Dulce.

Gurué is a city of just over 10 inhabitants located in the center of the province of Zambezia. Its population depends fundamentally on the tea plantations that you can find where you look once you leave the last houses behind. Salaries - as is often the case in so many African, Latin American or Asian countries - are low and irregular, leaving the great wealth that plantations provide to the exploiting landowners. They are generally foreigners: Portuguese or English.

Returning from work at sunset

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